fbpx
FedEx Establishes Direct Presence in Nigeria to Support Customers with International TradeRead more Open Society Foundations (OSF) Award $1.1 Million Grant to Afrobarometer to Spur Future GrowthRead more The annual Global Impact Conference 2022 brings together visionary business leaders to revolutionize educational systems and inspire collaborative actionRead more APO Group announces content partnership with Pan-African broadcaster VoxAfricaRead more MainOne, an Equinix Company’s MDXi Appolonia Achieves Tier III Constructed Facility certification (TCCF), Now Most Certified Data Center in GhanaRead more United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) warns rising tide of hunger, insecurity, and underfunding worsening gender-based violence risksRead more The Royal Thai Embassy presents the cultures of Thailand at the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Festival in KenyaRead more Climate change is the biggest global threat, young people in Africa and Europe tell European Investment Bank (EIB), Debating Africa and Debating EuropeRead more $2 million in prizes awarded at Conference of the Parties (COP27) to African youth-led businessesRead more Africa and Europe’s top business and public sector leaders gather to chart Africa’s economic rebirthRead more

Experts encouraged by Alzheimer drug preliminary data

show caption
A carer helps an elderly resident - one of three alzheimer sufferers in the establishment- in a house at L'Hay-les- Roses on the outskirts of Paris./AFP
Print Friendly and PDF

Sep 29, 2022 - 07:05 AM

WASHINGTON — Experts on Wednesday said they were encouraged after preliminary data for a new Alzheimer’s drug showed it slowed cognitive decline, the first medicine to accomplish this goal.

The treatment, called lecanemab, was tested in a clinical trial of nearly 1,800 people, and slowed cognitive decline by 27 percent across an 18-month period, according to early results announced by makers Biogen and Eisai.

“This is the first drug that’s been shown to not only remove the build-up of a protein called amyloid in the brain, but to have a small but statistically significant impact on cognitive decline in people with early-stage disease,” said Susan Kohlhaas of Alzheimer’s UK.

But experts cautioned their comments were tempered by the preliminary nature of the results, which were announced by press release ahead of publication in a peer-reviewed journal, as the companies look to bring the treatment to market as early as January 2023 in the United States.

Biogen previously brought another Alzheimer’s drug to market called Aduhelm, but there was significant controversy over the evidence it worked, and its approval led to three high-level resignations in the US Food and Drug Administration.

According to a statement by Biogen and Eisai, in addition to slowing cognitive decline, the new treatment also slowed build-up in the brain of the protein amyloid, which forms sticky plaques and kills brain cells.

Side effects included higher rates of swelling and bleeding in the brain in the group that received the treatment compared to the group that received a placebo.

Both treatment and placebo groups had people of similar characteristics, including a broad range of underlying conditions. A quarter were either Hispanic or African American.

Michel Vounatsos, CEO of Biogen, said the announcement “gives patients and their families hope that lecanemab, if approved, can potentially slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease.”

Masud Husain, a professor of neurology at the University of Oxford, said in a statement: “While the summary of the results certainly seems very encouraging, we have to be cautious until we are allowed to review the data fully.

“It is also important to bear in mind that the trial results apply only to people with mild Alzheimer’s disease, not everyone with the condition, and that there were important side effects of the drug, including bleeds in the brain.”

MAORANDCITIES.COM uses both Facebook and Disqus comment systems to make it easier for you to contribute. We encourage all readers to share their views on our articles and blog posts. All comments should be relevant to the topic. By posting, you agree to our Privacy Policy. We are committed to maintaining a lively but civil forum for discussion, so we ask you to avoid personal attacks, name-calling, foul language or other inappropriate behavior. Please keep your comments relevant and respectful. By leaving the ‘Post to Facebook’ box selected – when using Facebook comment system – your comment will be published to your Facebook profile in addition to the space below. If you encounter a comment that is abusive, click the “X” in the upper right corner of the Facebook comment box to report spam or abuse. You can also email us.